1. Isn't It Not Weird At All That ... The most tenacious voices on behalf of the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate during the opening Supreme Court arguments today came from the three female members of the court (all of whom are old enough to remember the pre-Roe years when abortion was illegal?)

In the case, two companies, including Hobby Lobby, are arguing that they should be allowed to violate the federal mandate that they provide certain kinds of birth control, including some IUDs and Plan B, because of their owners' religious beliefs. Essentially, using Citizens United as a precedent, the companies are arguing that corporations have the same religious rights as individuals under the first amendment.

The most tenacious voices on behalf of the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate during the opening Supreme Court arguments today came from the three female members of the courtFor example, Justice Sonia Sotomayor noted that a ruling in the companies' favor could give corporations the right to ignore the law on procedures as wide-ranging as vaccinations and blood transfusions, and to defy laws on gender discrimination, family leave, and the minimum wage.

The more Hobby Lobby-sympathetic justices, including likely swing vote (and previous abortion-rights opponent) Anthony Kennedy, suggested that not granting religious exemptions to corporations could lead to the government forcing companies to fund abortions.

2. Isn't it Weird That ... There's all this urbanist excitement and buzz about a new city program to make it easier for musicians to park and load their equipment at clubs—see giddy coverage at KOMO, KING 5, Seattle Weekly, Digital Music News, Musical Toronto, NPR, and BDCWire in Boston—when in the future, the only thing musicians are going to need to bring to a club is a laptop?

Come on urbanistas and futurists, stop cheering parking breaks for cars and guitars.

 

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